2018 Winter Session Courses


ART 105-01 Introduction to Studio Art
Course Description: 
Introduces the basic studio materials and techniques for making art in a variety of media that may include painting, drawing, ceramics, sculpture, printmaking, crafts, fibers, and/or electronic technology. Includes lectures, demonstrations, studio participation, museum or artist studio visits, and related historical information. Lab fee. Offered in selected Winter Sessions. 
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
9:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

ART 350-01 Topic: Public Art 
Students participate in the production and installation of public, site specific and collaborative works of art. Public art inhabits public spaces. Site specific work has a location and parameter requirements. Collaborative art requires multiple sources of input. These concepts are the basis for an investigation of art making practices that contribute to an expanding realm of creativity. 
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
9:00 a.m. - 12:30 p.m.

ART 350-2 Topic: Handmade books
Students investigate the physical structure and cultural meanings of books as three-dimensional objects. Media including paint, collage, hand-made paper, recycled materials as well as digital processes are used to develop content. Books are constructed using Japanese binding, accordion fold, and sewn pages with hardback covers among others.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

BIO 375-01 Topics in Tropical Biology (Costa Rica)
Course Description: 
An intensive field experience in neotropical ecosystems (rainforests, coral reefs, mangroves, caves, etc.). Descriptive studies of local flora and fauna will be combined with an in-depth investigation of a topic of interest. Field activities will include moderately strenuous exercise under a variety of weather conditions. Course fee required. Prerequisite: BIO 131 or consent. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Offered in selected winter sessions. Identical to EES 375.
Meeting Information:
Travel Course

BIO 400-01 Scanning Electron Microscopy
Course Description: 
Introduces the broad research applications of SEM. Topics include sample preparation, critical point drying, sputter coating, imaging, and x-ray microanalysis. Includes weekly hands-on training with the SEM and completion of an independent research project. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and consent. Identical to EES 400. Offered in select terms.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

BIO 400-02 Scanning Electron Microscopy
Course Description: 
Introduces the broad research applications of SEM. Topics include sample preparation, critical point drying, sputter coating, imaging, and x-ray microanalysis. Includes weekly hands-on training with the SEM and completion of an independent research project. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and consent. Identical to EES 400. Offered in select terms.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

CJ 250 Topics: Crime and the Media
Course Description: 
A seminar addressing announced topics that may include public policy in criminal justice, controversial/debated laws in the U.S., taboo practices, understanding violence, murder, property crime, corruption, ethics, and more. May be repeated for credit as designated topics change. Prerequisite: sophomore status or consent. Offered when circumstances permit.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
12:00-3:00p.m.

COMM 222-01 Public Speaking
Course Description: 
An individualized introduction to the theory and practice of informative and persuasive speech communication. Extemporaneous speaking is explored in depth while impromptu and group communication are also examined. The communication model is stressed, including sender, receiver, message (verbal and non-verbal) channel, noise, and feedback. Offered each semester.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
12:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

COMM 320-01 Experimental Film and Video
Course Description: 
Explores the history and theory of experimental film and video through lecture, discussion, reading, and screenings and through creative action. Students produce their own avant-garde videos as they learn the form's aesthetic heritage and contemporary developments. Prerequisite: COMM 101 or COMM 221 or consent. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

CS 201-01 Intro to 3D Modeling/Printing
Course Description:
Introduction to 3D modeling and printing. Several software packages are used to create and manipulate 3D models. Topics also include a survey of current applications of 3D printing, the mechanics of basic 3D printing technology, and factors involved in achieving a successful 3D print. Pass/fail grading. Prerequisites: Sophomore status or higher and placement level B or higher, or Math 104 with a grade of C or higher. $30 lab fee.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 
2:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

EES 250-01 Field Experiences in Earth and Environmental Sciences (Costa Rica)
Course Description: 
Provides students with an intensive field experience in selected habitats as they conduct studies to examine various geological sites and sample particular habitats. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Does not fulfill the Natural Science requirement for Latin honors. Lab fee. Prerequisite: consent. Offered in selected Winter Sessions or summers on demand.
Meeting Information:
Travel Course

EES 375-01 Topics in Tropical Biology (Costa Rica)
Course Description: 
An intensive field experience in neotropical ecosystems (rainforests, coral reefs, mangroves, caves, etc.). Descriptive studies of local flora and fauna will be combined with an in-depth investigation of a topic of interest. Field activities will include moderately strenuous exercise under a variety of weather conditions. Course fee required. Prerequisite: BIO 131 or consent. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Offered in selected winter sessions. Identical to BIO 375.
Meeting Information:
Travel Course

EES 400-01 Scanning Electron Microscopy
Course Description: 
Introduces the broad research applications of SEM. Topics include sample preparation, critical point drying, sputter coating, imaging, and x-ray microanalysis. Includes weekly hands-on training with the SEM and completion of an independent research project. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and consent. Identical to BIO 400. Offered in select terms.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

EES 400-02 Scanning Electron Microscopy
Course Description: 
Introduces the broad research applications of SEM. Topics include sample preparation, critical point drying, sputter coating, imaging, and x-ray microanalysis. Includes weekly hands-on training with the SEM and completion of an independent research project. May be taken for 2 or 4 credits. Prerequisites: junior/senior status and consent. Identical to BIO 400. Offered in select terms.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

ENG 105-01 College Writing
Course Description: 
An intensive introduction to several forms of college writing and to the critical thinking and research skills essential to producing them. Requires the submission of a portfolio that meets standardized requirements and is judged proficient by an outside reader. Three hours per week, plus regular conferences with the instructor. A grade of C or higher satisfies the first-semester English requirement. Prerequisite: placement. Prerequisite for enrollment during Winter Session or Summer Session 1: consent. Offered each semester.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.-1:00 p.m.

ENG 107-01 Practical Grammar
Course Description: 
A course in practical grammar, usage, and mechanics covering the most important rules to follow when proofreading. Emphasizes application of skills to students’ own writing. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
4:00-5:30p.m.

ENG 232-01 Literature Into Film
Course Description: 
An examination of the differences between literary and film narrative. Both popular fiction and classics are used in examining how plot, characterization, setting, spectacle, and other aspects of storytelling change depending on whether the medium is the written word, the stage, or the screen. Does not fulfill General Studies "T" requirement. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

ENG 250-01 Topic: Introduction to Literature
Course Description: 
As an introduction to the study and appreciation of literature and literary forms, this course explores the genres of fiction, poetry, and drama to help students develop their critical and aesthetic understandings of literature and its cultural and creative value. To do so, we will analyze and evaluate texts to expand students’ appreciation and enjoyment of literature. Through a study of literary conventions and our own reception and engagement of texts we will work to discern various aspects of quality and effect in literary techniques and styles to consider how literature functions to convey and construct meaning and significance on both personal and cultural levels. Prerequisite: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher. Offered most semesters.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
1:00 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.

GER 205-01 The Short Prose of Kafka
Course Description: 
Examines the short prose of Franz Kafka and its relevance in both literature and film today. Students search for common themes and interpretation in selected works. Taught in English. Prerequisites: GER 205: none. GER 305: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
12:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

GER 305-01 The Short Prose of Kafka
Course Description: 
Examines the short prose of Franz Kafka and its relevance in both literature and film today. Students search for common themes and interpretation in selected works. Taught in English. Prerequisites: GER 205: none. GER 305: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
12:00 p.m. - 3:30 p.m.

HE 201 Safety and First Aid
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
12 p.m.-3:00 p.m.

HIST 262-01 Seminar in the History of European Cities: Berlin
Course Description: 
Investigates the history of various European cities, including Berlin, Paris, London, Vienna, and Prague. Focuses on the history of art, architecture, city planning, and public spaces. Through walking tours, visits to museums and key landmarks, and musical performances, students investigate the historical developments of the cities, especially the conflicts radiating from the construction and destruction of the urban landscape. Begins at VWU with an on-campus component in which students prepare for an on-site study of the city. This study is followed by travel to the destination. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
1:00 p.m. - 5:00 p.m.

HIST 325-01 Radicalism, Terrorism, and Violence in American History 
Course Description: 
An examination of dissent, radical politics, terrorism, and political violence in American history from the colonial era to the present. Examines the impact and influence of historically important forms of violence, political crime, and state repression on American politics, culture, society, and economy. Other topics include the rise of different radical political ideologies and parties, mob violence, slave uprisings, filibusters, lynching, vigilantism, strikes, police and military repression, assassination, terrorism of the left and right, apocalyptic sects, and the role of violence in producing or forestalling social change and reform. Includes discussion of the different theoretical approaches developed by historians to explain the meaning of radicalism, terrorism, and violence in American history. Prerequisites: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher and sophomore/junior/senior status. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

HUM 205-01 Reacting to the Past
Course Description:
Using a role playing experience, students will explore important ideas, and historical figures in a variety of time periods, from ancient Greece to 20th century Argentina and beyond.  Through research, writing, and oral presentations, students will engage with challenging historical and contemporary issues.  Games will vary semester to semester.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
9:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

HUM 205-02 Reacting to the Past
Course Description:
Using a role playing experience, students will explore important ideas, and historical figures in a variety of time periods, from ancient Greece to 20th century Argentina and beyond.  Through research, writing, and oral presentations, students will engage with challenging historical and contemporary issues.  Games will vary semester to semester.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
9:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

INST 108-01 Developing a Roadmap to Research
Course Description: 
Introduces students to the research process and helps them develop the information literacy skills needed to succeed in college and in life. Students learn how to determine the extent of information needed, use effective research strategies, and evaluate and communicate research results, citing sources responsibly. Offered in selected semesters.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday 
9:30 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

INST 123-01 Service Learning in Hampton Roads 
Course Description: 
Raises civic consciousness by fostering engaged citizenship where students perform a week of direct community service. Orientation and preparation before the direct service, as well as a reflection journal, document student learning. May be repeated for credit. Identical to PORT 123. Offered each Winter Session.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
5:00 p.m. - 6:00 p.m.

INST 124-01 Service Learning and Issues of Civic Engagement in Hampton Roads
Course Description: 
Students are introduced to a community-based project and investigate the issue involved through research, reading, and lecture, followed by a week of direct community service. Includes reflection, assessment, and consideration of broader contexts. May be repeated for credit. Identical to PORT 124. Offered each Winter Session.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

INST 126-01 Music and Folk Culture of the Southern Appalachians 
Course Description: 
Introduces students to the music and folk culture of the Southern Appalachians, including Virginia, West Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, Georgia, and Alabama. Emphasizes the unique pre-World War II styles of rural dance music, social and religious music, and early commercially recorded music, including the old-time string band, jug bands, clawhammer style of banjo playing, unaccompanied fiddling, shape note singing, and balladry. Students examine the history, development, and structure of these regional music styles and try playing the music themselves in an old-time string band or jug band. Offered in selected Winter Sessions. 
Meeting Information:
Tuesday, Thursday
7:30 p.m. - 9:30 p.m.

INST 470 Developments in Science and Technology
Course Description: 
Explores the nature of scientific inquiry and the role of science and technology in our society by tracing the historical development and current state of several areas of science and technology. Considers the influence of culture, politics, religion, economics, and society on these developments and the impact of these developments on the society. Does not fulfill any requirements for Latin honors. Prerequisites: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher, junior/senior status, and one “L” course. Offered Winter Sessions of even-numbered years.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:00a.m.-12:00p.m.

MATH 104-01 Algebra and its Applications
Course Description: 
Presents topics in algebra through traditional and applications-based methods. Topics include functions, exponents and scientific notation, linear, exponential, rational and quadratic functions and graphs, systems of equations, quadratic and linear inequalities. Prerequisite: placement level C, Math 005 with a grade of C or higher, or consent. Students must have a TI-83 or TI-84 graphing calculator. Offered each semester.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

MATH 150-01 Topics in Modern Mathematics
Course Description:
Course exposes students to areas of modern mathematics. Topics vary but may include voting theory, game theory, mathematics and art, elementary number theory, graph theory and scheduling problems, management science, and others. Focus is on critical thinking skills, communicating mathematics orally and in writing, and applications to other disciplines. Prerequisite: placement level A or B.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
10 a.m. -12 p.m. and 1-3 p.m.

MATH 210-01 Introductory Statistics 
Course Description: 
Introduces students to learning from data. Topics include the basics of data production, data analysis, probability, Central Limit Theorem, and statistical inference. Statistical software is used for data management, calculation, and visualization. No previous knowledge of statistics is required. Prerequisites: Sophomore status or higher. Placement level B or A or H, or MATH 104 (C- or higher). Not appropriate for first-year students. Offered each semester.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
9:30 a.m. - 11:30 p.m. & 12:30 p.m. - 2:30 p.m.

MBE 246-01 Personal Financial Planning
Course Description: 
Introduces the principles of individual financial planning. Topics include goal setting and decision making, career planning, saving and investing, credit, and insurance. Prerequisites: MATH 104/105 or equivalent and sophomore/junior/senior status. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

MBE 315-50 Managing Diversity in Organizations
Course Description: 
Promotes an awareness of cultural differences and positive attitudes toward these differences. Includes topics related to effective management of people who vary in race, gender, age, disability status, nationality, or sexual orientation. Prerequisite: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.
Meeting Information:
ONLINE

MBE 350-01 Supply Chain Management and Logistics
Course Description: 
Provides an understanding of supply chain management and logistics processes as they apply to both service and manufacturing organizations. Special consideration is given to identifying ways in which the strategic use of supply chain management can create competitive advantages for firms. Prerequisite: MBE 301 or 316. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

MUS 101-01 Basic Musicianship
Course Description: 
Fundamentals of music, including pitch and rhythmic notation. Students learn to interpret music notation using recorders and other simple folk instruments. Students may not receive credit for MUS 101 if they have already taken MUS 102. Offered fall of odd-numbered years.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

PE 116 Personal Fitness Training
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m.- 12:00 p.m.

PE 133-01 Handball/Racquetball
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
12-3 p.m.

PE 133-02 Handball/Racquetball
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9a.m.-12 p.m.

POLS 300-01 Sex and Social Justice
Course Description: 
An examination of selected topics in comparative politics. Course topics may include Asian Pacific Rim, South Asia, Latin America, Contemporary Africa or the Middle East and North Africa. May be repeated for credit with different topic to description. Offered each semester.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

PORT 123-01 Service Learning in Hampton Roads
Course Description: 
Raises civic consciousness by fostering engaged citizenship where students perform a week of direct community service. Orientation and preparation before the direct service, as well as a reflection journal, document student learning. May be repeated for credit. Identical to INST 123. Offered each Winter Session. 
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
5:00 p.m.- 6:00 p.m.

PORT 124-01 Service Learning and Issues of Civic Engagement in Hampton Roads
Course Description: 
Students are introduced to a community-based project and investigate the issue involved through research, reading, and lecture, followed by a week of direct community service. Include reflection, assessment, and consideration of broader contexts. May be repeated for credit. Identical to INST 124. Offered each Winter Session.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
6:00 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

PORT 225: Career Study
Course Description: Provides an in-depth introduction to a career field of choice, an externship experience in that career field, and subsequent reporting and processing. Students spend the first week researching their career choice and the site at which they will extern. In the second week, they carry out the on-site externship. The final week is used to document, process, and present the lessons learned. They include final reflection and summary. (PORTfolio students will also update their electronic portfolio.)
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

PSY 385-01 Psychology of Eating Disorders
Course Description: 
Explores the psychology of eating disorders through readings, discussion, lectures, student research and presentations, and visits by clinicians. Students examine the pathology of eating disorders, as well as risk and protective factors for these disorders. Issues investigated include comorbidity with other disorders, etiology, neurobiology, and treatment and prevention. Prerequisites: PSY 101 or 102 and junior/senior status, or consent. Offered Winter Sessions of even-numbered years.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
9:00 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.

REC 219-01 Disability in the Media
Course Description: 
Explores various disabling conditions and related challenges/prejudices experienced by individuals with disabilities and how these individuals are portrayed in popular film and other media. Examines physical, psychological, emotional, and social life-conditions and allows students to examine their own attitudes and perceptions regarding disabilities. Offered Winter Session on demand.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
1:00-4:30 p.m.

REC 348-01 Maui to Moguls: The Impact of Adventure Travel on Culture and the Environment
Course Description: 
Examines the impact of adventure travel on culture and the environment. Students travel to two diverse locations, a ski area and the island of Maui, to learn how activities as diverse as skiing, snowboarding, snorkeling, hiking, windsurfing, and biking affect local culture, the economy, and preservation of the environment. Classroom work prepares the group for the travel experience. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
1:00-4:30 p.m.

Additional Information

RELST 308-01 Lobbying and Religious Advocacy
Course Description: 
Examines how, through approaches to lobbying and political advocacy, different religious communities engage in American politics, how their religio-historical views play a role in that engagement, and how their socio-historical context often have determined (or continue to determine) their level of access in the political realm. Offered in Winter Session.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
9:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

RELST 338 /COMM 333 The Faith and Art of Tyler Perry
Course Description: 
This course investigates the phenomenal cultural and financial success of writer/director/producer Tyler Perry in media productions. The course will examine how his remarkable personal story intersects with his films and television programs, the issues of faith, race, and politics that he raises, and the nature and function of his comic sensibilities, particularly in the persona of Madea. The course will study both the articulated vision of Tyler Perry and the criticism he has faced, exploring close textual readings of most of his films. 
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
9 a.m.-3 p.m. 

RELST 361-01 Ancient to Modern Israel
Co​urse Description:
This course offers students a nine-day study-abroad experience in Israel, a land whose history and major cities and sites allow a unique opportunity to explore the history and development of the Biblical literature, as well as of the three major monotheistic faiths, Judaism, Christianity, and Islam. On-site learning, coupled with reading prior to the trip and a reflective essay after returning, will allow students to explore major aspects of the study of religion in Israel/Palestine as relates to their own interests, majors, career paths– whether focusing on archaeology and the reconstruction of the past using its methods, the intersection of religion and politics in present-day community identities and their daily existence and struggles, or any of the other facets at which the study of religion in Israel/Palestine intersect with the studies of students participating in the trip.
Prerequisite: consent. 
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
9:00 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

SOC 308-01 Visual Sociology
Course Description: 
A survey of basic concepts in sociology as they are portrayed in selected motion pictures and music videos. Serves as a systematic application of sociological theory and practice. Prerequisite: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher; any sociology course would be helpful but not required. Offered each semester.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
1:00 a.m. - 4:30 p.m.

SPAN 219-01 Seminar in Hispanic Cultures
Course Description: 
A travel course focusing on the contrasting diversity and unifying elements of the Spanish- speaking world. Topic varies depending on the chosen destination. Students experience the culture and visit museums, historical landmarks, and key sites in order to examine the features that make Hispanic societies distinctive. May be repeated for credit as topic and destination vary. Satisfies the study abroad requirement in the Spanish major. Prerequisites: SPAN 219: Taught in English; consent to travel required. SPAN 319: SPAN 307 and/or consent is required; continue developing Spanish skills through oral practice and written assignments. Offered in selected winter, spring and summer sessions. Formerly SPAN 313.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

SPAN 270-01 Latin American Music and Dance
Course Description: 
Covers the history of dance beginning in ancient Europe and the Middle East and ends with the history of dance in Latin America, particularly that of the development of dance in the Hispanic society. Also studies the importance of Latin music and dance in Latin America and the U.S. In the practical portion of this course, students have the opportunity to learn a variety of Latin dances such as salsa, merengue, and bachata, which have become very popular in contemporary American society. This course is taught in English and does not fulfill the Foreign Language requirement. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
6:00 p.m. - 7:30 p.m.
7:30 p.m. - 9:00 p.m.

SPAN 319-01 Seminar in Hispanic Cultures
Course Description: 
A travel course focusing on the contrasting diversity and unifying elements of the Spanish- speaking world. Topic varies depending on the chosen destination. Students experience the culture and visit museums, historical landmarks, and key sites in order to examine the features that make Hispanic societies distinctive. May be repeated for credit as topic and destination vary. Satisfies the study abroad requirement in the Spanish major. Prerequisites: SPAN 219: Taught in English; consent to travel required. SPAN 319: SPAN 307 and/or consent is required; continue developing Spanish skills through oral practice and written assignments. Offered in selected winter, spring and summer sessions. Formerly SPAN 313.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday 
1:00 p.m. - 4:00 p.m.

SPED 371-01 Foundations/Legal/Ethical Issues in Education
Course Description: 
Provides an introduction and overview of the field of special education including the definition, identification, and characteristics of those that are disabled. Students with ADHD and gifted abilities are emphasized. Also includes historical perspectives, models, theories, and trends that provide the basis for general and special education practice including the dynamic influence of the family system, cultural/ environmental milieu pertinent to students, the understanding of ethical issues, and the practice of acceptable standards of professional behavior. Students taking this course will also gain an understanding of the legal aspects, regulatory requirements, and expectations associated with identification, education, and evaluation of all students. The rights and responsibilities of parents, students, and schools will also be a focus of this course. Prerequisite: consent only. Offered each fall.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday
5:00 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.

SW 318-01 Aging in the Media
Course Description: 
Explores aging through the context of popular media. The study begins with an overview of the major psychosocial theories on aging and explores how aging and older people are portrayed in a myriad of media. Students focus on film and view television programs, comics, and children's literature. This is a fun and innovative way to study the etic construct of aging through the Western (American and British) emic lens. Prerequisite: sophomore status or higher. Offered in selected Winter Sessions.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:30 a.m. - 1:00 p.m.

TH 270/370 Theatre Seminar: The Theatre Collective
Course Description: 
Provides opportunities to study particular subject matter or to take advantage of special competence by faculty member in a given semester. Previous topics include musical theatre and improvisation. Topics change as needs and resources develop. May be repeated for credit as topics change. Prerequisite: varies according to the topic of the seminar.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
9:00 a.m.-12:30 p.m.

WGS 219 Women in Culture and Society
Course Description: 
Students examine conflicting definitions of gender, analyzing general patterns and the impact of gender on their own lives. Ideas about gender are contrasted with the real-life situations of women and men. Emphasizes the opportunities and difficulties that women of different races, classes, sexualities, and disabilities encounter in today’s society. Offered each semester.
Meeting Information:
Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, Friday
1:00-4:00 p.m.

WS 004-01 Praxis Core Math Preparation
Course Description: 
Reviews topics covered on the Praxis Core for Educators Mathematics Test.  These topics form an essential body of basic mathematical knowledge for any classroom teacher and include algebra, geometry and measurement, and data analysis and probability.  The workshop covers both content and test-taking strategies. 
Meeting Information:
Monday, Wednesday, Thursday 
6:30 p.m. - 8:30 p.m.