Classical Studies/Latin Courses

Classics Courses

CLAS 105 Classical Mythology (4)
Explores methods of interpreting myths in their original contexts and affirms the continued relevance of mythology in modern society. Readings include Homer, Hesiod, Sappho, Aeschylus, Sophocles, Euripides, Plato, Aristotle, Virgil, and Ovid. Offered each fall.

CLAS 120 Introduction to Classical Archaeology (4)
Introduces students to the methods common to both Old and New World archaeology, followed by an introduction to and interpretation of the material remains of the ancient Greek, Roman, and Mediterranean worlds. Offered on demand.

CLAS 209 Greek History (4)
Uses readings in primary sources to portray life in ancient Greece for its own intrinsic interest and for its relevance to today’s world. Special attention is given to the first writers of history and to the development of Athenian democracy.

CLAS 210 Roman History (4)
Students read and analyze wide-ranging secondary and primary sources from history, literature, and archaeology to explore Roman civilization from its earliest beginnings, through the period of Republican expansion and transition into a vast empire, concluding with the Empire’s ultimate decline and dissolution. Special attention is given to Roman historiography and to the political changes from Republic to Empire.

CLAS 263 World Literature (4)
A chronological survey of major literary works from Ancient Near Eastern Epic to the European Middle Ages. Emphasizes the close reading of ancient literature within its immediate cultural context and the analysis of this literature in well-argued papers. Prerequisite: ENG 105 with a grade of C or higher. Identical to ENG 263. Offered when circumstances permit.

CLAS 264 World Literature II (4)
A survey of major works in world literature from the Renaissance to the present day emphasizing texts outside the British and American traditions. Particular attention is given to texts that put themselves in dialogue with Ancient Near Eastern and Classical Greek and Roman literary traditions. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or consent. Identical to ENG 264. Offered when circumstances permit.

CLAS 330 Classical Epic and the Epic Tradition (4) W
A study of epic works from the ancient Mediterranean and other cultures. Potential topics include Roman epic, Ancient epic, J.R.R. Tolkien and the epic tradition, and the oral-traditional epic. May be repeated for credit if topics vary. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or consent.

CLAS 350 Women in the Ancient World (4) W
Examines gender roles and sexual identities in ancient Greece and Rome through readings in primary sources supplemented by current scholarship. Explores contrasts between representations of women in Classical literature and the limitations they historically faced and the changes that occurred in women’s status according to place and time. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or consent.

CLAS 356 Classical Studies Abroad (4)
Travel to a relevant area within the cultural orbit of ancient Greece and Rome for on-site study of ancient Greco-Roman history and literary and material culture. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or consent.

CLAS 360 Classical Virginia (4)
An exploration of how classical narratives of exploration, political thought, literature, and art and architecture helped to shape the culture of the state of Virginia. Offered January Term when circumstances permit. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or consent.

CLAS 370 The Ancient World in the Cinema (4) (A)
Studies how ancient Greece and Rome continue to interest and influence us through the modern medium of cinema. Includes readings of selected classical texts and comparisons with modern screen treatments. Attention is given both to modern cinematic adaptations of ancient literary works and to epic “historical” spectacles. Examines directorial creativity, audience expectation, historical accuracy, and modern myth-making. Prerequisite: Sophomore status or consent.

CLAS 430 Classical Epic and the Epic Tradition (Senior Thesis)
Students enrolling in CLAS 430 will be responsible for reading and discussing the same material as students in CLAS 330, but will also help the instructor to present the material, and will write a 20+ page senior thesis instead of the shorter final paper required of students in CLAS 330. Students who have taken CLAS 330 may only take 430 for credit if the topic differs. Offered on demand.

Greek Courses

GREK 121 Beginning Ancient Greek I (4)
An introduction to the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of ancient Greek. Completion of the year-long sequence prepares students to read connected passages in ancient texts such as the dialogues of Plato or the New Testament; emphasis on Attic Greek or Koine dialects varies according to the instructor and interest of the class. Does not count toward the foreign language requirement. Offered on demand.

GREK 122 Beginning Ancient Greek II (4)
An introduction to the grammar, syntax, and vocabulary of ancient Greek. Completion of the year-long sequence prepares students to read connected passages in ancient texts such as the dialogues of Plato or the New Testament; emphasis on Attic Greek or Koine dialects varies according to the instructor and interest of the class. Does not count toward the foreign language requirement. Offered on demand.

GREK 213 Intermediate Ancient Greek (4)
Begins with a thorough review of basic Greek grammar as covered in GREK 121-122. Students then undertake extended readings in an ancient Greek text such as the New Testament or the Dialogues of Plato. Emphasizes translation and reading skills rather than speaking/listening skills. Prerequisite: GREK 122 with a grade of C or higher or placement. Offered on demand.

Latin Courses

LATN 111 Beginning Latin I (4)
Introduces the elements of the language of the Ancient Romans: vocabulary, syntax, and grammar. Students learn how to translate sentences and short stories. Focuses on translation and reading skills. Offered each year.

LATN 112 Beginning Latin II (4)
Introduces the elements of the language of the Ancient Romans: vocabulary, syntax, and grammar. Students learn how to translate sentences and short stories. Focuses on translation and reading skills. Prerequisite: LATN 111. May be used toward fulfillment of the language requirement. Offered each year.

LATN 213 Intermediate Latin (4)
Introduces students to advanced grammar as they read a real Latin text such as the poems of Catullus or the speeches of Cicero. The primary goal is to gain facility in reading Latin, but the course also introduces students to ancient Roman literary aesthetics and culture. Focuses on translation and reading skills rather than speaking/listening skills. May be used toward fulfillment of the language requirement. Prerequisite: LATN 112 or equivalent. Offered each year.

LATN 305 Topics in Latin Prose (4)
Reading and translation from one or more Latin prose authors arranged by author (e.g., Apuleius) or by topic or genre (e.g., the Roman novel, Arthurian legends, etc.). May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Prerequisite: LATN 213 or placement. Offered on demand.

LATN 306 Topics in Latin Poetry (4)
Reading and translation from one or more Latin poets, arranged by author (e.g., Virgil) or by topic or genre (e.g., lyric, epic). May be repeated for credit as the topic varies. Prerequisite: LATN 213 or placement. LATN 305 is not a prerequisite. Offered on demand.

LATN 471 Practicum in the Teaching of Latin (4)
A workshop that introduces advanced students of Latin to current teaching methods in the language. Students serve as assistants in Elementary Latin while meeting regularly with the instructor to gain hands-on experience in the practical aspects of teaching Latin. Ordinarily taken in the semester prior to EDUC 445/446. Prerequisites: LATN 305 or 306 and consent. Offered on demand.